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Climate Hustle

2013 SkS Weekly News Roundup #13

Posted on 30 March 2013 by John Hartz

  • Asia cuts its carbon faster than Europe
  • Climate change now seen as security threat worldwide
  • Coal and coral: Australia's self-destructive paradox
  • Do global climate tipping points exist?
  • Drier climate will spread diarrhoea
  • How global warming has prevented Spring's arrival
  • Most in U.S. concerned about sea level rise
  • Old King Coal keeps rollin’ along
  • Our carbon, our climate, our cash
  • Two key climate change concepts are ‘misunderstood’
  • Volcanic eruption in Iceland did little to lower CO2

Asia cuts its carbon faster than Europe

Producing more goods and services while emitting less carbon is the dream of many economists. In the race to see which countries can best manage to do this, East Asia is stealing a march on the US and Europe. And contrary to popular conceptions, China is now making faster progress than Germany and the United Kingdom towards competitiveness in tomorrow’s low-carbon world.

Asia cuts its carbon faster than Europe by Alex Kirby, Climate News Network, Mar 27, 2013


Climate will harm Mekong Basin harvests

Within 40  years densely-populated south east Asia, whose agricultural exports also feed many millions beyond its borders, will be experiencing the full impacts of climate change, a study says.

Climate will harm Mekong Basin harvests by Alex Kirby, Climate News Network, Mar 29, 2013  


Coal and coral: Australia's self-destructive paradox

NPR Science Correspondent Richard Harris traveled to Australia's Great Barrier Reef to find out how the coral reefs are coping with increased water temperature and increasing ocean acidity, brought about by our burning of fossil fuels. Day 5: A return to shore finds that people prefer cars to corals.

Coal And Coral: Australia's Self-Destructive Paradox by Richard Harris, NPR, Mar 23, 2013


Do global climate tipping points exist?

An academic debate ponders whether Earth's climate could change precipitously, and how unmitigated regional stressors could irrevocably alter the planet.

Quick-Change Planet: Do Global Climate Tipping Points Exist? by David Levitan, Scientific American, Mar 25, 2013


Drier climate will spread diarrhoea

Researchers say they have found a clear link between climate change and the spread of diarrhoea and similar diseases in one African country. But the nature of the link may be unexpected.

Drier climate will spread diarrhoea by Alex Kirby, Climate News Network, Mar 27, 2013


How global warming has prevented Spring's arrival

Well now, it turns out that spring's slow arrival in the US is likely being driven by changes half a world way, in the Arctic.

Some of the nation's most prominent climate researchers announced at a news conference on Tuesday that melting Arctic sea ice may actually be the culprit behind winter's refusal to pack its bags and leave.

Scientists from NOAA and various university climatology departments said that melting Arctic sea ice may be weakening the planet's jet stream currents, and causing extreme weather systems to linger in the United States.

How Global Warming has Prevented Spring's Arrival by Thom Hartmann, Truthout, Mar 28, 2013 


Most in U.S. concerned about sea level rise, poll finds

Nearly three-fourths of respondents agree that rising sea level resulting from climate change is a threat to the U.S., and 82% believe we should prepare for the effects.

Most in U.S. concerned about sea level rise, poll finds by Neela Banerjee, Los Angeles Times, Mar 28, 2013


Old King Coal keeps rollin’ along

Emissions by the US of greenhouse gases are still coming down – within the USA itself. But American exports of coal, and now of shale gas, are on the rise, in effect exporting the pollution which has been avoided at home.

Old King Coal keeps rollin’ along by Kieran Cook, Mar 27, 2013


Our carbon, our climate, our cash

We all buy stuff that generates carbon dioxide emissions and threatens the stability of our climate. We don’t directly pay the resulting costs, which are postponed to a vague and indefinite future in which none of us can be held individually accountable for a devastating increase in the level and variability of average global temperatures.

A tax on carbon consumption could help solve the problem, bringing the prices of carbon-intensive goods and services into closer alignment with their true costs and discouraging us all from buying more of them.

Our Carbon, Our Climate, Our Cash by Nancy Forlbre, New York Times, Mar 25, 2013 


Two key climate change concepts are ‘misunderstood’

There is widespread confusion about the near-term benefits of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and that misunderstanding may be complicating the formidable task of reducing manmade global warming, argue two climate researchers in Science in a story published Thursday.

Two Key Climate Change Concepts Are ‘Misunderstood’ by Andrew Freedman, Climate Central, Mar 28, 2oi3


Volcanic eruption in Iceland did little to lower CO2

Plankton, tiny marine organisms, are a good way of cleansing the atmosphere of one of the main greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide. To do this they need dissolved iron to help them to grow, and if they lack iron then they cannot do much to reduce CO2 levels.

So the eruption in 2010 of an Icelandic volcano gave scientists a perfect opportunity to see how much the cataclysm helped the plankton by showering them with unexpected clouds or iron.

Their verdict, published in the journal Geophysical Research Lettersthe volcano certainly helped, but not for long enough to make much difference.

Volcanic Eruption in Iceland Did Little to Lower CO2 by Alex Kirby, Climate News Network/Climate Central, Mar 25, 2013

 

 

 

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Comments

Comments 1 to 4:

  1. Missing link:

    Two key climate change concepts are ‘misunderstood’ [climatecentral.org]

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    Moderator Response: [JH] Link inserted. Thanks for bringing this to our attention.
  2. The first article just mentions that China overtook Germany & UK in "Low-Carbon Competitiveness Index" and is placed third while Germany and UK fell to places 6 & 5. And that US rates bad: no score, apparently out of competition.

    I cannot find what that LCCI means, so I have no perspective on this rather surprising news, because the popular believe is to blame China on increased emissions, that grow still faster than the renewables, period. I would like to see some analysis of that LCCI, particularly the most interesting numbers: what dent it makes in each contry's emissions now and/or how does it influence the prognosis of future emissions.

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  3. chirskoz:

    The article, Asia cuts its carbon faster than Europe, contains the following paragraph:

    The report, the Climate Institute/GE Low-Carbon Competitiveness Index, published by the Climate Institute, was first released in 2009. This year’s edition relies on data from 2010.

    I have quickly perused the website of the Carbon Institute for a definition of the Low-Carbon Competitiveness Index (LCCI). The definition I found is embedded in the news release, Australia alone in low-carbon competitiveness slide posted on Mach 19, 2012.

    The (LCCI) index measures carbon competitiveness through the examination of nearly 20 indicators in three areas: sectoral composition (historical snapshot of current economy – e.g. transport, trade emissions intensity); early preparedness (e.g. investment in clean energy, growth in emissions); and future prosperity (e.g. investment in education and infrastructure).

    The compilation of the LCCI is a joint effort between the Carbon Institute and GE Australia and New Zealand.  

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  4. chriskoz:

    Also check out the Climate Institute's report, Global Climate Leadership Review 2013, for addtional details about the LCCI.

    Note: The article, Asia cuts its carbon faster than Europe summarizes the findings of this report.    

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