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Climate Hustle

2013 SkS Weekly News Roundup #20A

Posted on 15 May 2013 by John Hartz

  • A change in temperature
  • Arctic waters growing alarmingly acidic
  • 'Best estimate' for impact of melting ice on sea level rise
  • Canada sells out science
  • Climate change 'will make hundreds of millions homeless'
  • Fewer Rain Forests mean less energy
  • Obama administration outlines new policy the Arctic
  • Ralph Keeling ponders a sobering milestone
  • Sea levels are rising - but how quickly?
  • Swift political action can avert a carbon dioxide crisis
  • UK government faces an exodus of energy experts
  • Warmer climate threatens Africa’s vital cassava crop

A change in temperature

Since 1896, scientists have been trying to answer a deceptively simple question: What will happen to the temperature of the earth if the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere doubles?

A Change in Temperature by Justin Gillis, New York Times, May 13, 2013


Arctic waters growing alarmingly acidic

In the past 200 years the average acidity of surface waters in the world’s oceans has risen by 30 percent. This is prime evidence of humans really changing the entire planet.

Arctic waters growing alarmingly acidic by Erlend Lånke Solbu, The Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation, ScienceNordic, May 11, 2013 


'Best estimate' for impact of melting ice on sea level rise

Researchers have published their most advanced calculation for the likely impact of melting ice on global sea levels.

'Best estimate' for impact of melting ice on sea level rise by Matt McGrath. BBC News, May 14, 2013


Canada sells out science

Over the past few years, the Canadian government has been lurching into antiscience territory. For example, they’ve been muzzling scientists, essentially censoring them from talking about their research. Scientists have fought back against this, though from what I hear with limited success.

But a new development makes the situation appear to be far worse. In a stunning announcement, the National Research Council—the Canadian scientific research and development agency—has now said that they will only perform research that has “social or economic gain”.

This is not a joke. I wish it were.

Canada Sells Out Science by Phil Plait, Bad Astromony Blog, Slate, May 13, 2013


Climate change 'will make hundreds of millions homeless'

It is increasingly likely that hundreds of millions of people will be displaced from their homelands in the near future as a result of global warming. That is the stark warning of economist and climate change expert Lord Stern following the news last week that concentrations of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere had reached a level of 400 parts per million (ppm).

Climate change 'will make hundreds of millions homeless' by Robin McKie, the Guardioan, May 12, 2013


Fewer Rain Forests Mean Less Energy

The loss of tropical rain forests is likely to reduce the energy output of hydroelectric projects in countries like Brazil that are investing billions of dollars to create power to support economic growth.

That is the conclusion of a group of experts whose findings, released Monday, run counter to the conventional understanding of deforestation’s impact on watersheds. 

Fewer Rain Forests Mean Less Energy for Developing Nations, Study Finds by Felicity Barringer, Naew York Times, May 13, 2013


Obama administration outlines new policy for the Arctic

The Obama administration on Friday released a national strategy for the Arctic in advance of Secretary of State John Kerry’s trip next week to Sweden to attend a conference of eight polar nations.

Obama administration outlines new policy for protecting, drilling in the Arctic by Erika Bolstad,McClatchy, Washington Bureau, May 10, 2013


Ralph Keeling ponders a sobering milestone

Climate scientist Ralph Keeling has followed in the footsteps of his father, who pioneered the measurement of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. In an interview with Yale Environment 360, the younger Keeling talks about the implications of crossing an alarming CO2 threshold this month.

Son of Climate Science Pioneer Ponders A Sobering Milestone by Fen Montaigne, Yale Environment 360, May 14, 2013


Sea levels are rising - but how quickly?

Scientists are warning that the level of the sea may rise by slightly more than previously forecast - but they also say that the very worst predictions look much less likely. 

Sea levels are rising - but how quickly? by David Shukman, BBC News, May 14, 2013


Swift political action can avert a carbon dioxide crisis

Carbon dioxide levels have reached an all-time high. But there is some hope if governments take the figures seriously 

Climate change: swift political action can avert a carbon dioxide crisis, Editorial Board, The Observer/The Guardian, May 11, 2013


UK government faces an exodus of energy experts 

The Government is facing an exodus of senior energy and climate change advisers amid growing concerns that decisive action to tackle global warming is falling victim to Treasury intransigence.

Coalition faces an exodus of energy experts as funding for renewables is held up on grounds of cost by Paul Bignell and Oliver Wright, The Independent, May 11, 2013


Warmer climate threatens Africa’s vital cassava crop

A plant which is a staple food crop for millions of people across Africa is at risk from disease as regional temperatures rise, scientists say.

The plant, cassava, is a significant source of food and income, and is an important industrial crop, and there is concern that serious food shortages may result and poverty worsen.

Experts say the spread of the disease could halve cassava production and threaten the diets of 300 million people.

Warmer climate threatens Africa’s vital cassava crop by Alex Kirby, Climate News Network, May 11, 2013

 

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