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All IPCC definitions taken from Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis. Working Group I Contribution to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Annex I, Glossary, pp. 941-954. Cambridge University Press.

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2020 SkS Weekly Climate Change & Global Warming News Roundup #23

Posted on 6 June 2020 by John Hartz

A chronological listing of news articles linked to on the Skeptical Science Facebook Page during the past week: Sun, May 31 through Sat, June 6, 2020

Editor's Choice

The world must seize this opportunity to meet the climate challenge

As current and former central bankers, we believe the pandemic offers a unique chance to green the global economy

Financial System Reform

‘Over the last year, we have seen record temperatures across Europe, extreme rainfall in the US, and, for the first time ever, wildfires in the Arctic.’ Soaring temperatures in Paris, July 2019. Photograph: Bertrand Guay/AFP/Getty Images

we are currently in the midst of the most severe macroeconomic shock since the second world war. The disruption to our daily lives and subsequent impact on our economies has been enormous. We are seeing first-hand that a collective response is needed to defeat a common enemy, as authorities across the world courageously mobilise all available resources to fight the Covid-19 pandemic.

This crisis offers us a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to rebuild our economy in order to withstand the next shock coming our way: climate breakdown. Unless we act now, the climate crisis will be tomorrow’s central scenario and, unlike Covid-19, no one will be able to self-isolate from it.

In the immediate response to the pandemic, governments have taken measures of unprecedented scale to keep economic and financial systems afloat. The IMF estimates that approximately $9tn of fiscal support has been provided across the world. This is necessary to limit acute and permanent damage. But as we consider the next stage of recovery, we must look beyond the immediate crisis and think more strategically about how we do it.

The world must seize this opportunity to meet the climate challenge, Opinion by Andrew Bailey, Mark Carney, François Villeroy de Galhau & Frank Elderson. Comment is Free, Guardian, June 5. 2020

 Andrew Bailey is governor of the Bank of England; François Villeroy de Galhau is governor of Banque de France; Frank Elderson is chair of the Network for Greening the Financial System and executive board member of the Nederlandsche Bank; Mark Carney is UN special envoy for climate action and finance.

Click here to access the entire opinion piece as originally published on The Guardian website.


Articles Linked to on Facebook

Sun, May 31, 2020

Mon, June 1, 2020

Tue, June 2, 2020

Wed, June 3, 2020

Thu, June 4, 2020

Fri, June 5, 2020

Sat, June 6, 2020

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Comments

Comments 1 to 2:

  1. Yes!!!! This is an inflection point in which we could change the course of our world, which is heading toward a series of serious climate melt downs but no where it the old aphorism Who Pays the Piper Calls the Tune more true than in politics.  Politicians don't do the bidding of the rich and powerful because their political campaigns were supported in the last election.  They do their bidding because they know that they won't be supported next time if they don't toe the line.  Barack Obama toyed with the idea of not taking money from the vested interests and then folded.  The only politician I am aware of that has actually adhered to this principle; that really understands the corrosive effect political contributions are having on every aspect of our life is Bernie Sanders.  A huge movement is needed to bring him back into the fold.  Otherwise we have another 4 years of Trump or 4 years of Biden.  Look at Biden's voting record to see what this means.  I know we are not supposed to bring politics into the discussion but politics, at this point in our history, is the only real game in town.

    https://mtkass.blogspot.com/2018/01/wasted-effort.html

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    Moderator Response:

    [DB] Self-promotional advertising snipped.

  2. Central banks seem to be speaking up more, and being more proactive, just a personal observation. Not entirely a bad thing. Perhaps this is because they sense the politicians have bad policies, because they have been bought out by special interest business groups :)

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